Orange Clove Bath Bombs Recipe

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The Coziest Warming Orange Clove Bath Bombs Recipe

You’ll fall for the instant comfort of this warming orange clove bath bombs recipe. It makes the coziest bath ever with natural essential oil and a sprinkle of clove! 

Who doesn’t love a good bath bomb? They are essentially “the easy button” to relaxation. And this orange clove bath bomb recipe adds a wonderful twist to its appeal with warming clove and sweet orange. 

It’s a beautiful balance of spicy and sweet and just the thing for the cooler months!

But, I have to be honest… learning how to make bath bombs wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be. Five years ago, on a hot and humid summer day, I attempted to make my first bath bombs, and it didn’t go as planned. So, I’m sharing several tips and tricks that I’ve learned to make bath bombs successfully since then. 

And I’ll explain how to make bath bombs with step-by-step instructions because I don’t want you to miss out on the instant comfort these spiced bath bombs create! 

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This orange clove bath bombs recipe takes a bath bombs to a whole new level with warming essential oils and spice. They are all things cozy!

How To Make Bath Bombs With Sucess!

Save these tips to make your bath bombs more successful than my first try years ago. Each can make a huge difference in the result; before you know it, they’ll be a breeze to create! 

What can you make bath bombs in?

No matter how pretty a vintage muffin or jelly mold looks, don’t try to make bath bombs in them. Because I did, and they wouldn’t come out of the mold! You’ll also want to avoid cheap empty plastic round ornaments. The plastic cracked under the weight of the bath bombs when I tried them. Instead, spend 10 to 15 dollars on metal bath bomb molds. This great set of 15 makes 3 different size bath bombs. 

What can you use instead of citric acid in bath bombs?

Suppose you don’t want to wait for Amazon fresh to deliver citric acid to your door. You can use cream of tartar. But, you’ll need a lot more than the little jar in your pantry to make bath bombs, like a 1 pound bag.

And I must say, while cream of tartar is an acid, it has a different PH level, and the fizzing isn’t as strong as citric acid in bath bombs. 

Before removing a bath bomb from the mold, how long do you need to wait? 

It’s best to allow bath bombs to stand in metal bath bomb molds for one to two minutes before releasing. If you’re having trouble with the release, try rubbing a little coconut oil inside the bath bomb molds to help. And make sure you are overpacking each side of the bath bomb mold. 

For a silicone mold, 8 hours or overnight is best to avoid crumbling. 

How do I make smoother bath bombs?

If your homemade bath bombs are clumpy or bumpy, there’s an easy fix to make smoother bath bombs. Use a handheld sifter or a fine mesh strainer like this one to filter all the dry ingredients for a fine grain base. 

If you can’t seem to master bath bombs, then make bath fizzes instead. My recipe for lavender rose oatmeal bath fizzes were a happy result of failed bath bombs. 

Related To: Beginner Bath Bomb Guide

You’ll fall for the instant comfort of this warming orange clove bath bombs recipe. It makes the coziest bath ever with natural essential oils, real orange peel and a sprinkle of clove!

What are the ingredients to make a bath bomb?

No matter what bath bomb recipe you want to make, they all include these staple ingredients. 

Baking Soda

Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate, is a naturally occurring substance—best known for its use as a scouring agent and odor absorber. Baking soda is used as a binding agent in bath bomb recipes. And it also softens your bath water.

Hardening Agent

To add sturdiness to bath bombs, you’ll want to choose a hardening agent. This ingredient helps bath bombs hold their shape, and all you need is a small amount. Choose from kaolin clay, cornstarch, or arrowroot powder. Each of these options has the same ability to harden bath bombs.

Citric Acid

Citric acid is the ingredient that makes bath bombs fizz! It’s an all-natural ingredient often used to preserve food at home when canning. Sometimes you can find it at your local grocery store in a tiny spice jar for a very big price. I buy it here in one or two pound resealable bags for so much less. I use it in a handful of my natural cleaning recipes too!

Epsom Salts

Thanks to Epsom salts, bath bombs do a lot for our bodies. Named after a small town in England where it was discovered in 1618, Epsom salts are known for their powerful ability to relieve aches and pains. They break down the build-up of lactic acid, which causes muscle pain.

Carrier Oil

This ingredient adds moisturizing benefits as well as vitamins and antioxidants essential for healthy skin to your bath bomb recipes. There are a variety of carrier oils available such as apricot kernel oil, fractionated coconut oil, grapeseed oil, and sweet almond oil

Essential Oils

You can make bath bombs without essential oils. I primarily use them for creating a natural fragrance in bath bombs, but I enjoy their skin-loving properties and aromatherapy. 

For this bath bomb recipe, I choose orange essential oil for its high levels of vitamin C and sweet scent. And clove essential oil for its warming abilities, spicy aroma, and aid in reducing inflammation.  

Witch Hazel

I use witch hazel in place of water to make bath bombs. Because it doesn’t cause as much fizzing loss to occur when you need to add just a little more moisture to the bath bomb mix. It’s a plant-based substance made from the witch hazel shrub and a staple in my homemade facial toner.

Outside of these bath bomb ingredients, I included orange mica powder to create a natural bright orange color and a dash of ground clove spice to top each bath bomb. 

They are each a lovely autumn or Christmas bath bomb with a beautiful spiced scent and a reminder of Christmas orange pomander ornaments. Make a dozen handmade gifts this season with a batch of these bath bombs!

Related To: 5 Fantastic DIY Fall Soap Recipes

Who doesn’t love a good bath bomb? They are essentially “the easy button” to relaxation. And this orange clove bath bomb recipe adds a wonderful twist to their appeal with warming clove and sweet orange.

Spiced Orange Clove Bath Bombs Recipe

The spiced, warm, intense aroma of these orange clove bath bombs is one you will quickly fall for too! They create the coziest bath EVER! 

With this orange clove bath bombs recipe, you can make six large 5-ounce bath bombs or 12-15 small 2-ounce bath bombs.

Bath Bomb Ingredients:

How To Make Bath Bombs:

Combine Dry Ingredients:

Sift 1/2 cup of baking soda, ⅛ cup of arrowroot powder, or cornstarch into a large glass mixing bowl. Add an ⅛ cup of Epsom salts and whisk all the dry ingredients together, removing any remaining clumps after sifting. Then add a ¼ teaspoon of orange mica powder to the dry mixture and whisk once more to blend the color. (Do not the ground clove in this mixture)

Combine Wet Ingredients:

Next, add 2 teaspoons of sweet almond oil, 5 drops of orange essential oil, and 5 drops of clove essential oil into a separate, small glass bowl. Stir to combine wet ingredients. 

Combine Dry and Wet Ingredients:

Slowly pour the wet mixture into the dry mixture, whisking as you go. If the mixture begins to fizz or foam, slow down. 

Test the Mixture:

To test the consistency, scoop a small amount of the bath bomb mixture into your hand and squeeze it together. It should stick together and hold its shape. If the mixture is too dry and powdery, add a ½ teaspoon of witch hazel or water. Then mix well and test again. Repeat until you have the correct consistency. 

Form Bath Bombs:

Now, add one pinch of ground clove inside the base of one-half of a bath bomb mold. Then scoop it into the bath bomb mixture until it’s just overflowing. Scoop the other side into the mixture, press the halves together, and make a twisting motion. 

Reveal and Dry: 

Let the bath bomb in the mold stand for 2 minutes. Once set, gently release the bath bomb onto a cutting board or cookie sheet. 

If a bath bomb cracks while removing it, scoop a little more mixture into the molds and press together again. Allow bath bombs to dry uncovered for 8 hours or overnight. Once dry, store in a container or dry place until use. 

This orange clove bath bombs recipe is a beautiful balance of spicy and sweet and just the thing for the cooler months!

Orange Clove Bath Bombs Recipe

Yield: 12-15 bath bombs

This orange clove bath bombs recipe is a beautiful balance of spicy and sweet and just the thing for the cooler months!

Materials

  • ½ cup baking soda
  • ⅛ cup arrowroot powder or cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons sweet almond oil
  • ¼ cup citric acid
  • ⅛ cup Epsom salts
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons witch hazel or water, as needed
  • ¼ teaspoon orange mica powder
  • 5 drops orange essential oil
  • 5 drops clove essential oil
  • ¼ teaspoon ground clove

Instructions

Combine Dry Ingredients:

Sift 1/2 cup of baking soda, ⅛ cup of arrowroot powder, or cornstarch into a large glass mixing bowl. Add an ⅛ cup of Epsom salts and whisk all the dry ingredients together, removing any remaining clumps after sifting. Then add a ¼ teaspoon of orange mica powder to the dry mixture and whisk once more to blend the color. (Do not the ground clove in this mixture)

Combine Wet Ingredients:

Next, add 2 teaspoons of sweet almond oil, 5 drops of orange essential oil, and 5 drops of clove essential oil into a separate, small glass bowl. Stir to combine wet ingredients. 

Combine Dry and Wet Ingredients:

Slowly pour the wet mixture into the dry mixture, whisking as you go. If the mixture begins to fizz or foam, slow down. 

Test the Mixture:

To test the consistency, scoop a small amount of the bath bomb mixture into your hand and squeeze it together. It should stick together and hold its shape. If the mixture is too dry and powdery, add a ½ teaspoon of witch hazel or water. Then mix well and test again. Repeat until you have the correct consistency. 

Form Bath Bombs:

Now, add one pinch of ground clove inside the base of one-half of a bath bomb mold. Then scoop it into the bath bomb mixture until it’s just overflowing. Scoop the other side into the mixture, press the halves together, and make a twisting motion. 

Reveal and Dry: 

Let the bath bomb in the mold stand for 2 minutes. Once set, gently release the bath bomb onto a cutting board or cookie sheet. 

If a bath bomb cracks while removing it, scoop a little more mixture into the molds and press together again. Allow bath bombs to dry uncovered for 8 hours or overnight. Once dry, store in a container or dry place until use. 

Notes

There's no "wrong way" to use a bath bomb. However, you’ll get the most out of a bath bomb if you add it to your bath water after filling the bathtub. You can then slip into the bath and enjoy watching it spin and fizz.

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How To Use A Bath Bomb

There’s no “wrong way” to use a bath bomb. However, you’ll get the most out of a bath bomb if you add it to your bath water after filling the bathtub. You can then slip into the bath and enjoy watching it spin and fizz.’

As the color spreads, so will the moisturizing ingredients and essential oils. And the baking soda will soften the water, and the Epsom will dissolve into the water while you reap all the benefits! 

This orange clove bath bombs recipe makes a lovely autumn or Christmas bath bomb with a beautiful spiced scent and a reminder of Christmas orange pomander ornaments. Make a dozen handmade gifts this season with a batch of these bath bombs!

This recipe takes bath bombs to a whole new level with warming essential oils and spices. They are all things cozy! Can you guess what everyone on my gift giving list is getting this year? Speaking of gifts, find this fun recipe and so many more in my book Holiday Essential Oil Gift Making!

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This orange clove bath bombs recipe is a beautiful balance of spicy and sweet and just the thing for the cooler months!

Save this orange clove bath bombs recipe to your bath bomb Pinterest board, and while you’re there, be sure to follow Life-n-Reflection for more inspiring ideas.
Did you know you can Tag #lifenreflection on Instagram to share yours with me?

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