How to Make Sugar Mold Candles

16 Shares

How to Make Sugar Mold Candles to Refill Inserts

Did you know you can make sugar mold candle inserts to refill your candle holder centerpiece? This is how to make sugar mold candles at home for less money!

If you’re a regular here, then you know I am obsessed with making candles! But, I’m not one to drop 6 to 8 dollars on a single candle container. Instead, I look for ways to reuse other containers, such as yogurt jar beeswax candles, coffee mug candles, and mason jar candles

And I also love to shorten my shopping list by making staples like dishwasher detergent and all-purpose surface spray. This practicality applies to candles too, of course – homemade tea lights and votives, anyone? 

Well, that’s how this candle tutorial came about. I’ll be honest I’ve always wanted to learn how to make sugar mold candles! You can’t ignore the rustic beauty of “old meets new” in sugar mold candles. Right?

With a bit of trial and error, I figured out how to make sugar mold candles to refill the candle cups. Interestingly, I haven’t seen a tutorial for this yet. So, I thought I share one ASAP! 

This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience; please read the full disclosure policy.

Use my guide to make sugar mold candle inserts to refill your candle holder centerpiece.

There’s Just One Thing You Should Look Out For LEAKS!!

First off, I don’t recommend pouring candle wax right into a wood sugar mold candle. It can be done; I’ve seen these for sale at market pop-ups. But I think it’s a waste. And it would not be easy to clean out and refill. Refilling the metal candle inserts is much easier. 

Now, let’s talk leaks. Used, unused, vintage, or new sugar mold tins; always check for leaks. I bought my sugar mold candle and tin cups from a local boutique. And following my own advice, I checked the metal cups for leaks. Water poured like a river out of one, and a few others had slow drips. 

So, I got out my 100% waterproof sealant and applied a heavy coat, and waited 30 minutes for it to dry. But, then in my rush to make these cute candles, I went straight to work – placing wicks, melting my wax, and pouring each candle. 

Not long after, wax started pooling out from the bottom of two. Eek! Good thing I had my kitchen island lined. What happened? I skipped the second coat of sealant and didn’t retest the sugar mold cups for leaks. Please don’t make my mistake – Apply two heavy coats of sealant with drying time between layers. And a final test. 

It might surprise you how many containers need to be sealed first before making candles in them, and some are just not safe. Metal containers are #1 on my list of safe candle containers

If you already have sugar mold candles, you can refill the cups with the tutorial below. You also buy a set of replacement sugar mold tins with the same look as antiqued-aged sugar molds. They measure  2 3/4” tall, 2 5/8” wide, and are specifically made to fit wooden sugar molds. 

Related To: Candle Making Supply List

This is how to make sugar mold candles at home for less money! The tin cups make it so easy to replace the candles after you’ve burned them down.

Where do you find sugar mold candle holders? 

Check your local vintage markets and antique stores for sugar molds. If you can’t find one or don’t want to pay the price tag on the real deal, go for a remake like this one. It’s a two-hole sugar mold candle that looks just like the ones from the past, but at a much lower price! 

How much wax do you need to refill sugar mold candle inserts?

Each sugar mold candle cup holds 3.5 ounces. I used my candle calculator to account for the fragrance I added and to convert the ounces each cup holds into weight. 

I filled four sugar mold tin cups and added 1 ounce of natural pumpkin permission fragrance. (It’s a blend of cinnamon, orange, clove, lemon, ginger, and nutmeg essential oils – Mmm). 

So, I melted 0.875 lbs of virgin coconut soy wax. It’s one of my favorite wax types because it’s a single pour wax. Meaning you only have to pour it once; no double pour or heat gun is needed for a smooth top! 

Related To: How to Fix Candle Problems

How To Prepare Sugar Mold Tins:

After you’ve burned your candles down to ½ an inch of wax at the bottom, it’s time to clean them up and refill. Pop the sugar mold candle inserts in the freezer for a few hours. The candle wax will contract, and it should come right out with a tap on the counter – like ice cube trays (remember those). 

If that doesn’t work, the water bath method always works. Fill a pot or deep baking dish with boiling water. Then carefully place your sugar mold tins inside without the water spilling into them. The heat from the water will transfer through the metal tins and melt the wax inside. 

Pour the wax into a double layer of plastic bags (thank you, Target) or wipe it out with a paper towel. NEVER pour wax down the drain! You can clean them up if needed with hot soapy water after the wax is out. 

After cleaning, make sure you seal them with two heavy coats of 100% waterproof sealant with 30 minutes of drying time in between. 

Pin these steps on how to make sugar mold candles to refill sugar mold candle inserts. So, you can use them again and again!

How to Make Sugar Mold Candles 

This is how to make sugar mold candles at home for less money! The tin cups make it so easy to replace the candles after you’ve burned them down. 

Sugar Mold Candle Supplies:

4 sugar mold tin cups (3.5 ounces each)

0.875 lbs virgin coconut soy wax

1-ounce pumpkin permission fragrance oil

4 natural cotton wicks

4 glue dots

Instructions to Make Sugar Mold Candle Refills:

Step 1: 

First, see the steps above to clean, prep, and seal each sugar mold cup first. Then cover your area or line a cookie sheet with parchment or wax paper to place each sugar mold candle insert on.

Next, press the tab on the bottom of a natural cotton wick into a glue dot on the roll. Then place it into the center base of a sugar mold cup. Repeat for each cup. 

Step 2:

Next, slice off chunks of virgin coconut soy wax and use a kitchen scale to measure 0.875 pounds. I like to place my candle melting pitcher on the scale, Tap tare weight and add the wax.

Step 3:

Now, place the melting pitcher filled with candle wax inside a saucepan filled with approximately 2 inches of water. Use the double boiler method to heat the wax on low up to 150°F max.  

Clip a candle thermometer inside the pitcher or use a no-touch infrared thermometer to keep an eye on the heat of the wax. And stir slowly, yet often with a heat-resistant silicone spatula.

Step 4: 

After the candle wax is completely melted, turn off the heat source and, if needed, allow the wax to cool before adding your fragrance. I used 1-ounce pumpkin permission fragrance oil – it smells divine! 

After adding your fragrance slowly, stir it into the wax constantly for 1 to 2 minutes to thoroughly incorporate the scent. 

 Step 5: 

Then use the spout of your candle melting pitcher to fill each sugar mold candle insert. Place the pitcher with the remaining wax back in the double boiler. And hold the wicks centered, upright with clothespins or other wick-centering bars.

 Step 6: 

Allow the sugar mold candles to cure for 24 hours before trimming the wick to ¼ an inch. If you want a strong scent, then wait at least three days before lighting. 

Printable Instructions:

I figured out how to make sugar mold candles to refill the candle cups.

How to Make Sugar Mold Candles

Yield: 4 candles

Materials

  • 4 sugar mold tin cups (3.5 ounces each)
  • 0.875 lbs virgin coconut soy wax
  • 1-ounce pumpkin permission fragrance oil
  • 4 natural cotton wicks
  • 4 glue dots

Tools

  • candle melting pitcher
  • kitchen scale
  • thermometer

Instructions

Step 1: 

First, see the steps above to clean and prep each sugar mold cup. Then cover your area or line a cookie sheet with parchment or wax paper to place each sugar mold candle insert on.

Next, press the tab on the bottom of a natural cotton wick into a glue dot on the roll. Then place it into the center base of a sugar mold cup. Repeat for each cup. 

Step 2:

Next, slice off chunks of virgin coconut soy wax and use a kitchen scale to measure 0.875 pounds. I like to place my candle melting pitcher on the scale, Tap tare weight and add the wax.

Step 3:

Now, place the melting pitcher filled with candle wax inside a saucepan filled with approximately 2 inches of water. Use the double boiler method and heat on low up to 150°F max.  

Clip a candle thermometer inside the pitcher or use a no-touch infrared thermometer to keep an eye on the heat of the wax. And stir slowly, yet often with a heat-resistant silicone spatula.

Step 4: 

After the candle wax is completely melted, turn off the heat source and, if needed, allow the wax to cool before adding your fragrance. I used 1-ounce pumpkin permission fragrance oil - it smells divine! 

After adding your fragrance slowly, stir it into the wax constantly for 1 to 2 minutes to thoroughly incorporate the scent. 

Step 5: 

Then use the spout of your candle melting pitcher to fill each sugar mold candle insert. Place the pitcher with the remaining wax back in the double boiler. And hold the wicks centered, upright with clothespins or other wick-centering bars.

Step 6: 

Allow the sugar mold candles to cure for 24 hours before trimming the wick to ¼ an inch. If you want a strong scent, then wait at least three days before lighting. 

Notes

When you finish burning these candles, clean out the sugar mold inserts again and refill!

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Did You Love This?

Follow Life-n-Reflection on Pinterest for More - Use this Pin button!

When you finish burning these candles, clean out the sugar mold inserts again and refill! Don’t you love that? 

I think these sugar mold candles look interesting anywhere you add them to your decor. And to mix things up, you can plant a succulent in the tins too! 

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE: 

I figured out how to make sugar mold candles to refill the candle cups.

Pin these steps on how to make sugar mold candles to refill sugar mold candle inserts. So, you can use them again and again! Tag #lifenreflection on Instagram to share your candle making with me.

16 Shares

RELATED POSTS

LEAVE A COMMENT

Skip to Instructions